Studies


Each year, approximately 2,500 students from around the world pursue a creative, studio-based education at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), which offers rigorous bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in 19 art, design and art education majors. Many of those degree programs offer courses that focus on health and healthcare issues. The following is a selection of health-related courses that have recently been offered.


ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-18


HPSS-S140 EMBODYING FEMINISMS/FEMINIST EMBODIMENTS

3 credits

Gail Cohee

For much of its history, feminism has revolved around and centered on the gendered body, whether in terms of the body contextualized within time, space, and culture; in terms of the mind and body as oppositional forces; in terms of health, reproduction, or representation; or in terms of the body as part of or outside “nature.” This course will examine feminist relationships to the gendered body in terms of various social and historical locations, as well as in relationship to dis/ability, queerness, reproduction, and the “natural” and built environment.

(WINTER)


SCI-1099 HUMAN ANATOMY: FORM AND FUNCTION 

3 credits

Amy Chew

This course examines the form and function of the human body, with a focus on the musculoskeletal system and surface form. Each week, we will cover a different area of the body, working our way through the trunk and limbs to the neck and head. For each area, we will first consider the anatomical structure, including the bones, muscles, nerves, arteries and veins. We will then study the function, including movement, systems and processes. Each area will be further explored through common injuries and syndromes with an anatomical basis, which are illustrative of function through dysfunction. We will discuss treatments with an anatomical basis, including typical surgical approaches and procedures, and the design of prosthetics. Through this course, we will demystify and develop an appreciation for the wondrous complexity of the human body and its role in art and design.

(FALL)


ILLUS-3108 ARTISTIC ANATOMY 

3 credits

Ralph Drury

Students in this course will investigate the specific physical structure of the human body, with the aim of producing drawings of greater structural and visual integrity and more fluid descriptions of movement and weight in the figure. We will proceed through the skeletal and muscular systems at a brisk but reasonable pace, learning names, points of articulation and the dynamic functions of each component of the body. Each weekly assignment will consist of a careful, descriptive drawing of an element of the skeletal or muscular system, and a ‘dynamic’ drawing in which that same element is shown in action in the living figure. We will also review the work of artists, both contemporary and historical, who have made vital artistic use of the elements of anatomical study. The course includes an optional field trip to the Brown University Evolutionary Biology Lab to draw from cadavers. There will be at least one written test on anatomical facts and terminology. The course culminates in a final project on the theme of ‘A Human Ideal’, exploring past concepts of idealized form in the figure in relation to anatomical reality and contemporary cultural perspectives.

Major elective; restricted to Illustration juniors and seniors; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of instructor.

(FALL/SPRING)


HPSS-S486 MULTICULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits

Melissa Marcotte

Multicultural Psychology is more than just understanding and appreciating diversity, it’s about the influence that a multicultural world has on individuals and social systems that exist within it. Together we will explore the social constructs of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and ability through readings, videos, in-class activities, and class discussion. Informed by psychological theory and research, we will examine the impact that these labels have on a person’s identity development, societal positioning, and mental and physical health and well-being. By the end of the class, students will be able to explain the advantages and challenges that individuals and societies face as we become more interconnected in a diverse world. HPSS-S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates.

(FALL)


HPSS-S618 CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES IN ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits

Jeffrey Poland

In this course we will examine a number of controversies over various scientific, clinical, and social practices concerning mental illness. Topics include: classification and diagnosis (e.g, Is mental illness a myth?, Can mental health professionals distinguish normality from abnormality?, Is psychiatric classification useful?, Is there a gender bias in psychiatric classification?), the character of specific psychiatric conditions (e.g., alcoholism, depression, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), treatment issues (e.g., the psychotropic medication of young children, electroconvulsive therapy, suicide prevention), and social issues (e.g., the insanity defense, involuntary commitment, the duty to warn.)

HPSS-S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates.

(SPRING)


LAS-E233 BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS

3 Credits

Shannon Zellars-Strohl

This course focuses upon two interconnected threads in the literature of nineteenth-century Britain-issues of gender and the development of the medical profession. During the Victorian age, the medical field sought to establish itself as a respectable and organized profession, and this effort led to widespread discussions and developments amongst practitioners who attempted to discover the causes and cures of various ailments and perfect their understanding of the human body.

As male doctors attempted to establish their position as the sole authority on the human body, women’s bodies became a primary focus in medical circles. Victorian medicine portrayed women’s bodies as potentially dangerous; they could infect others through disease, go mad, make themselves ill through overwork, die as a result of menstruation, pregnancy, or childbirth, pass on problematic traits to their children, and even become murderous as a result of biological drives. Interestingly, the medical profession also offered an idealized portrait of female health, sometimes believing women to be “born good,” describing ill women as beautiful or saintly, and championing the idea that women made the best caregivers for other sick people.

In this class, we will read a variety of literature which focuses upon gender and medicine in the Victorian age, drawing upon actual medical articles, newspaper stories, fiction, poetry, memoirs, and even examining pieces of art. We will discuss topics which include (but are not limited to) revivification, invalidism, mesmerism, feminism, the doctor-patient relationship, nursing, reproduction and childbirth, insanity, disability, pseudo-science, masculinity, sexually transmitted diseases, contagion, and psychiatry.

Open to sophomore and above.

(FALL)


SCI-1008 ART AND SCIENCE OF SAVING SPECIES

3 Credits

Lucy Spelman

This course gives students the opportunity to explore successes and failures in conservation. In the process, they will discover that scientific understanding of how to save a species is only part of the process. We also need to understand how interdependent we are, and how our continued success depends on a diverse and healthy animal kingdom. Using examples, students will study what we do and do not know about a particular animal (established scientific information and ongoing scientific research) including why it is endangered and what conservation strategies exist for helping it. They will also examine what motivates us to protect a particular animal, including the value we place on it (social, ecological, and economic role), including how it is portrayed in the media, in literature, and in the arts. The work for the course would include attendance, readings and written responses, in-class discussion, and completion of a 10-page research paper accompanied by a work of original art designed to engage others in the topic.

(WINTER)


HPSS-S481 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL INEQUALITY, LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

3 credits

Claudia Ford

In this course we will explore the interdisciplinary subjects of global environmental justice, environmental racism, and other environmental inequalities. The primary goal of this course is for students to comprehend the multiplicity of critical issues, debates, and responses within global and local environmental justice. We will discuss and analyze environmental justice as a movement that involves marginalized communities in diverse ways in a globalized world. Using case studies, this course will consider examples of toxic distribution and exposure, accidents and disasters, regulatory failures, barriers to political participation, and the commodification of land and labor. The course will identify contemporary responses to environmental inequalities including grassroots local and international advocacy, climate justice, food justice, indigenous rights, ecofeminism, and Julian Agyeman’s concept of “just sustainabilities.” The class will travel to a unique brownfields and envrionmental justice restoration site on a Native American reservation in the Hudson Valley.

HPSS-S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates.

(FALL)


SCI-1002 BOTANY IN THE KITCHEN 

3 credits

Hope Leeson

While we eat foods from over 60 different plant families, we rarely stop to consider how any of those plants might be related from an evolutionary standpoint, or why we might eat one species of the family (say the potato), but not another (the deadly nightshade). This course will look at the context in which the plants we eat exist among the hundreds of thousands of plants on this planet. Organized around the human culinary uses of plants, the class will explore the evolutionary relationships between foods, and discover what it is, that links them together. We will examine the parts of plants humans consume, and in so doing discover how taste and nutritional value found in leaves, seeds, and roots, is linked to nutrition and protection for plants themselves. The seminar will culminate with a botanical feast, created by the class and featuring unique dishes created from taxonomically related groups of plants.

(WINTER)


SCI-1001 WATER EMERGENCY: THE SCIENCE OF WATER, HUMANS AND DESIGN SOLUTIONS

3 credits

Bonnie Epstein Silverman

Water is the driving force of all nature – Leonardo da Vinci. Humanity’s relationship with water is fickle – although necessary for life, when it is plentiful we take it for granted. We use water to make electricity, remove our waste, cool our power plants, irrigate our crops and -of course – drink. Sometimes we do several of theseat once, leading to unfortunate results. Learn thescience behind the planet’s water and how humanityinteracts with it. We will visit water treatment andsewage treatment plants examine the causes andresults of drought, wild fire, salt-water contaminationwells, shrinking aquifers, “nutrient pollution” of oceansand more. The goals of this course are threefold: (1) Toclarify how water works in earth’s systems spanninggeology, chemistry, biology and physics (2) To outlinehow humans interact and leave their mark on everystep of these cycles and (3) To encourage students tounderstand these water issues as challenges in need ofthe intelligent and creative solutions that they areequipped to deliver. This course will include a finalproject design solution to an aspect of one of thewater problems touched on in class. No prior sciencebackground is required.

(WINTER)


HPSS-S526 SEM: PHILOSOPHY OF DEATH 

3 credits

Donald Keefer

Socrates described philosophy as an intellectual preparation for death. He recognized that how we react to, think about, and cope with finality tells us a great deal of what we think about the core of our existence. Philosophers have been divided between a “bald scenario” that death is nothing but the end of our material existence to which we are limited, and the more reassuring view that death is a door to another personal plane of existence. Death is nothing vs. death is everything. We will examine these phenomena from philosophical points of view through reflection primarily on philosophical works but will include religious sources and literary works. While philosophers have primarily focused understandably on the individual confronting death, we will constantly place these questions and their answers within interpersonal and social spheres of consideration. We will focus on: What is Death? The role of death in the meaning of life; personal survival in various scenarios; ethical issues surrounding suicide, euthanasia, and other voluntary ending of life. We will look at a few of the social practices surrounding death and examine their meaning and functionality. Intensive reading, writing, and participation in seminar format.

Open to sophomore and above. HPSS-S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates.

(FALL)


HPSS-S666 NEUROETHICS 

3 credits

Jeffrey Poland

In this course we will examine many of the ethical, social and philosophical issues raised by ongoing developments in the brain sciences. With improved understanding of how the brain works comes new powers for understanding, monitoring, and manipulating human cognitive, emotional and behavioral functioning; such new powers have potentially profound implications for the law, social policy, clinical practice, and personal experience. Topics to be covered will include: moral judgment and decision making, freedom of the will, moral and legal responsibility, use of psychopharmacology for enhancement of mood and cognition, the neural basis of pro-social and anti-social behavior, neuroimaging and privacy, the use of neuroimaging data in courts of law (e.g., to assess truth-telling and the accuracy of memory), brain injury and brain death, the development of neurotechnologies, and the importance of ethical and social guidelines.

HPSS-S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates.

(FALL)


LAS-E329 LIVING WASTE LANDS: TRASH, ENERGY, AND SUSTAINABILITY IN FICTION 

3 credits

Kate Neilsen

In 1858, Edmund Dixon noted that even if you could “annihilate” all of Earth’s garbage, sending it “off to the moon,” the results would be disastrous, eventually leading to “utter sterility, famine, and the death of the human race.” For Dixon, trash was inescapable but necessary, simultaneously contaminating and valuable. Waste underscores the limits of urban sustainability, and utopian visions of cities often depict an (almost) closed system, with a purpose for everything discarded and unused. In this course, we will ask: How have writers and artists imagined the function of trash in society? What can garbage tell us about a place? How do the principles of thermodynamics shape the way that we think about waste? In considering such questions, we will look at historical and contemporary works, including Dickens’s Our Mutual Friend, Henry Mayhew’s London Labour and the London Poor, Vivan Sundaram’s Trash, and Lucy Walker’s documentary Waste Land.

(SPRING)


GRAPH-3113 X, Y, AND Z 

3 credits

James Goggin

This course will involve a range of collaborative exercises, inquiries, experiments, lectures, readings, screenings, site visits, and projects, exploring graphic design as an inherently multidimensional and spatial discipline. 3D, not 2D. Graphic design as object, as projection, as display, as gauge, as structure, as installation, as sound, as architecture. Not just the X and Y, but also the Z axis. The course’s subtitle is “Graphic Design in Space,” a literal example being Carl Sagan’s “Pioneer Plaque,” the sum of humankind and space travel etched in pictographic form onto a pair of aluminum plaques attached to NASA’s Pioneer 10 probe on its 1972 mission to planet Jupiter. We will also investigate more terrestrial, yet equally literal, types of space and how they relate to the human body: pages, screens, rooms, buildings, and cities. A wide range of periods, fields, and figures will be surveyed: from the likes of Marcus Vitruvius Pollio, Leonardo da Vinci, and Albrecht Dürer, to Le Corbusier, Charles and Ray Eames, and Fiona Banner. Ultimately, we’ll consider graphic design not only as orthographic (an anthropomorphic system that operates in multiple dimensions), but also as orthography (interpreting and communicating these spaces through signs and symbols).

Major elective; Graphic Design majors only.

Open to senior and above.

(FALL)


INTAR-2374 HUMAN FACTORS 

3 credits TBA

The psychology of the client/user influences the design of the environment and the practice of interior architecture. This course will explore issues of anthropometrics (the study of the characteristics of the human body), ergonomics (the application of anthropometric data to design), and proxemics (the study of the effect of cultural/psychological factors on design). During the semester the student will gather facts about the interaction of the environment and a user’s culture, gender, stage of life cycle, and physical characteristics. These ideas will be implemented in the design and construction of an object.

Major requirement: BFA INTAR majors only.

(FALL)


DM-1512 *ROME:SENSING THE CITY:AUGMENTED INTERACTION WITH THE CITY OF ROME

3 credits

Paolo Cardini

During this class students will transform themselves into recording devices, able to experience the environment and simultaneously becoming physical representation of their surroundings. The course will be organized into three main phases: Feel, Make and Sense. The first phase will be about “feeling the city” and the students will “flaneur” around Rome, self-reflecting on their perceptions and identifying interesting multi-sensorial elements. The second phase mostly focused on making, will teach students how to create wearable devices that, through the use of new technologies (sensors, Arduino boards, motors, servos, but not limited to those), will react to external stimulus and/or collect environmental data. The third and last phase will be about “sensing the city”. Rome will provide the experimental context where students will test and perform their creations, walking through the city and letting their wearable devices responding to the crowd, the noise, the narrow streets, the light or anything else they will design them for.

This class support an interdisciplinary approach to creativity and it welcome students from design, sculpture, new media, furniture, apparel and any other individual interested in the relation between the body and the space. The course will include a travel to Venice to visit the Art Biennial and a collaboration with a local Makerspace.

Students must complete an application for RISD Global Summer Studies. Course not available via web registration. 

(SUMMER)


ACADEMIC YEAR 2016-17


ILLUS 3108 ARTISTIC ANATOMY

3 credits

Eric Telfort

Students in this course will investigate the specific physical structure of the human body, with the aim of producing drawings of greater structural and visual integrity and more fluid descriptions of movement and weight in the figure. We will proceed through the skeletal and muscular systems at a brisk but reasonable pace, learning names, points of articulation and the dynamic functions of each component of the body. Each weekly assignment will consist of a careful, descriptive drawing of an element of the skeletal or muscular system, and a ‘dynamic’ drawing in which that same element is shown in action in the living figure. We will also review the work of artists, both contemporary and historical, who have made vital artistic use of the elements of anatomical study. The course includes an optional field trip to the Brown University Evolutionary Biology Lab to draw from cadavers. There will be at least one written test on anatomical facts and terminology. The course culminates in a final project on the theme of ‘A Human Ideal’, exploring past concepts of idealized form in the figure in relation to anatomical reality and contemporary cultural perspectives.

Major elective; restricted to Illustration juniors and seniors; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of instructor.

(FALL)


INTAR 2374 HUMAN FACTORS

3 credits

Faith Baum

The psychology of the client/user influences the design of the environment and the practice of interior architecture. This course will explore issues of anthropometrics (the study of the characteristics of the human body), ergonomics (the application of anthropometric data to design), and proxemics (the study of the effect of cultural/psychological factors on design). During the semester the student will gather facts about the interaction of the environment and a user’s culture, gender, stage of life cycle, and physical characteristics. These ideas will be implemented in the design and construction of an object.

Major requirement: BFA INTAR majors only Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

(FALL)


LAS E786 SEM: “EATING THE WAY BACK HOME”: FOOD, LITERATURE & IDENTITY

3 credits

Jonathan Highfield

In “The Wretched of the Earth” (1961), Frantz Fanon writes, “The relations of man with matter, with the world outside, and with history are in the colonial period simply relations with food.” Fanon recognizes that for the colonized subject existence itself is so threatened that every bit of food one can gain access to is, as he writes, “a victory felt as a triumph for life.” The foods people choose to eat and the ways they prepare those foods speak volumes about their relationship to the land and reflect their history. Postcolonial storytellers, writers, and filmmakers use food and foodways as markers of independence, as symbols of cultural colonization, and as signs of continued deprivations. Through foodways one can glimpse famines, invasions, and historical access to trade networks, and food itself can even serve as a vehicle for communication. Since these stories are not constructed in a vacuum, they also can reveal something about what food means in specific historical moments, in specific places, and for specific populations. This course will look at the roles food and foodways play in a series of narratives from formerly colonized spaces. Writers we will read may include Chris Abani, Bessie Head, Tsitsi Dangarembga, and Ken Saro-Wiwa.

Sophomore and above

(SPRING)


HPSS S564 NCSS CORE SEMINAR

3 credits

Peter Dean

This course provides an interdisciplinary but comprehensive introduction to key issues in Nature-Culture-Sustainability studies. It will provide an in-depth engagement with sustainable material use exploring the “five kingdoms” of nature, the “five core principles of sustainability” and “the five flows through the built environment”. The course will also address Biometics, Ecological Economics, Environmental Health and Wonder as well as providing in depth discussion of existing real world projects involving the use of sustainable materials. Attempts will be made to arm students with an effective understanding of how they can apply principles of sustainability to their future studies and careers.

This course will lay the foundation for the NCSS Concentration students as they pursue their major degree as well as their participation in the NCSS Concentration. The course format will be lecture/seminar with occasional guest lectures. Permission of instructor required Also offered as IDISC 2403. Register in the course for which credit is desired.

Course Level: Sophomore, Junior

(FALL/SPRING)


HPSS S481 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL INEQUALITY, LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

3 credits

Claudia Ford

In this course we will explore the interdisciplinary subjects of global environmental justice, environmental racism, and other environmental inequalities. The primary goal of this course is for students to comprehend the multiplicity of critical issues, debates, and responses within global and local environmental justice. We will discuss and analyze environmental justice as a movement that involves marginalized communities in diverse ways in a globalized world. Using case studies, this course will consider examples of toxic distribution and exposure, accidents and disasters, regulatory failures, barriers to political participation, and the commodification of land and labor. The course will identify contemporary responses to environmental inequalities including grassroots local and international advocacy, climate justice, food justice, indigenous rights, ecofeminism, and Julian Agyeman’s concept of “just sustainabilities.”

(SPRING)


LAEL 1519 LIVING SYSTEMS, LAB AND FIELD

3 credits

Lucy Spelman/Jennifer Bissonnette

Rhode Island, the second most densely populated state in the nation, has a history of environmental problems that include overfishing, salt marsh degradation and deforestation from agriculture, and soil and water pollution from the textile and jewelry industry. Its flora and fauna include introduced species as well as nearly extinct ones. Its 35 islands and 400 miles of tidal coastline are subject to rising sea levels from climate change. This 3-credit course is designed to give students the laboratory skills needed to study how humans impact ecosystems at both a micro- and macro-biological level, using the Nature Lab as the base of operations, and Rhode Island as an example. Scientific disciplines and techniques covered will include biochemistry, cell biology, parasitology, microscopy, specimen collection, genetics, zoology, botany, ecology, and GIS mapping. Teaching and learning methods will include lectures, labs, field trips, written responses to weekly readings, discussions, and a final project.

Sophomore and above

(SPRING)


HPSS S526 SEM: PHILOSOPHY OF DEATH

3 credits

Donald Keefer

Socrates described philosophy as an intellectual preparation for death. He recognized that how we react to, think about, and cope with finality tells us a great deal of what we think about the core of our existence. Philosophers have been divided between a “bald scenario” that death is nothing but the end of our material existence to which we are limited, and the more reassuring view that death is a door to another personal plane of existence. Death is nothing vs. death is everything. We will examine these phenomena from philosophical points of view through reflection primarily on philosophical works but will include religious sources and literary works. While philosophers have primarily focused understandably on the individual confronting death, we will constantly place these questions and their answers within interpersonal and social spheres of consideration. We will focus on: What is Death? The role of death in the meaning of life; personal survival in various scenarios; ethical issues surrounding suicide, euthanasia, and other voluntary ending of life. We will look at a few of the social practices surrounding death and examine their meaning and functionality. Intensive reading, writing, and participation in seminar format.

Sophomore and above

(FALL)


HPSS S666 NEUROETHICS

3 credits

Jeffrey Poland

In this course we will examine many of the ethical, social and philosophical issues raised by ongoing developments in the brain sciences. With improved understanding of how the brain works comes new powers for understanding, monitoring, and manipulating human cognitive, emotional and behavioral functioning; such new powers have potentially profound implications for the law, social policy, clinical practice, and personal experience. Topics to be covered will include: moral judgment and decision making, freedom of the will, moral and legal responsibility, use of psychopharmacology for enhancement of mood and cognition, the neural basis of pro-social and anti-social behavior, neuroimaging and privacy, the use of neuroimaging data in courts of law (e.g., to assess truth-telling and the accuracy of memory), brain injury and brain death, the development of neurotechnologies, and the importance of ethical and social guidelines.

(SPRING)


HPSS S442 ISTANBUL

3 credits

Andrew Robarts

Drawing upon literary works to reconstruct and imagine urban life, this course focuses on the historical development of Istanbul – the capital city of the Ottoman Empire for 500 years and the largest and most important city in the Republic of Turkey today. Economic, social, and cultural institutions, forms of entertainment, and communal relations that enriched daily life in Istanbul are addressed. This look at the pleasures of the city is counterbalanced by an examination of the vicissitudes of violence, disease, and natural disasters which ravaged the residents of Istanbul across the Ottoman centuries. The last part of the class addresses the transformation and modernization of Istanbul in the nineteenth century and its place in the Republic of Turkey in the twentieth century.

Sophomore and above HPSS S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates

(FALL)


LAEL LE99 HUMAN ANATOMY: FORM AND FUNCTION

3 credits

Amy Chew

This course examines the form and function of the human body, with a focus on the musculoskeletal system and surface form. Each week, we will cover a different area of the body, working our way through the trunk and limbs to the neck and head. For each area, we will first consider the anatomical structure, including the bones, muscles, nerves, arteries and veins. We will then study the function, including movement, systems and processes. Each area will be further explored through common injuries and syndromes with an anatomical basis, which are illustrative of function through dysfunction. We will discuss treatments with an anatomical basis, including typical surgical approaches and procedures, and the design of prosthetics. Through this course, we will demystify and develop an appreciation for the wondrous complexity of the human body and its role in art and design.

(FALL)


ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-16


GRAD 155G ENCOUNTERING THINGS: SUBJECTS, OBJECTS & THE PROSTHETIC IMAGINATION

3 credits

Hannah Carlson

This class explores the ways that objects and bodies come into contact with one another, asking how objects adorn, articulate, equip, augment, and constitute the person. Our exploration follows three tracks: we examine artifacts from the fields of design, fashion and medical engineering, as well as experimental propositions from the visual and conceptual arts, literature and film; we pair these case studies with scholarship that critically engages issues of embodiment and material agency; and we attend to the political and ethical debates raised by dynamic conceptions of posthuman bodies. Interdisciplinary readings across the humanities and social sciences include: Appadurai, Freud, Haraway, Hayles, Heidegger, Latour, Marx, Miller, and Scary.

Graduate Elective – seminar Pending review and approval by the Curriculum Committee

(FALL)


ILLUS 3024 ELEMENTS OF ADVERTISING

3 credits

David Porter

Advertising often seeks to convince without persuasive argument: it appeals to the visceral rather than the cerebral, to the emotional rather than the intellectual. Students in this course will develop forceful and provocative visual statements that at first address issues of social concern: smoking, substance abuse, climate change, homelessness. etc. The latter half of the course will be devoted to the creation of advertisements that are both memorable and irresistible.

NB: Illustration is inextricably linked to language of some sort: a text, a cartoon, a poster, a book cover. ELEMENTS OF ADVERTISING will require its participants to invent captions for their images that focus, amplify or deepen the effect of the visual statement.

Major elective; Restricted to Illustration juniors and seniors; open to nonmajors pending seat availability and permission of instructor. This course fulfills the Illustration Concepts requirement for Illustration majors.

(SPRING)


ID 20ST04 SPECIAL TOPIC DESIGN STUDIO | HEALTH BY DESIGN: CHANGING HEALTHCARE WITH CREATIVE PROGRAM INTERVENTIONS

3 credits

Dr. Claudia B. Rebola

Worldwide, society struggles to deliver healthcare across populations and diverse cultures. The solutions in the future will require an integrated approach of design innovation and cultural understandings. This two-semester course is a multi-disciplinary studio group that engages students, faculty and outside partners in projects addressing social problems through collaboration, strategic thinking, and project-based learning approaches. The main focus of the Fall course is on engaging with local cultures and health challenges within the state of Rhode Island. Students will learn skills related to research methodologies/analytic frames for designing interventions and implementation plans within the context of issues identified locally. These include health across life spans (early childhood and aging); health innovation and entrepreneurship practices; and social/environmental health geographies. This course will give students tools for designing and implementing healthcare design solutions. The Fall course is part of a two-phase studio course that will continue Spring semester, but note there is no requirement or guarantee for students to enroll in the second phase.

Junior Elective – open to the RISD/Brown Community

(FALL)


HPSS S449 SEM: SOCIAL GEOGRAPHIES OF ART, DESIGN, AND COMMUNITY PRACTICE

3 credits

Marie Cieri

In this seminar, we will take a social geographical approach to investigating a growing trend toward the merging of art and design – and the aestheticization of everyday life – with the social, economic, political and environmental interests of global capitalism. Additionally, we will explore forces within contemporary art, design and community practice that are resisting these trends; examples include a collaborative project involving artists, scientists, landscape designers and many thousands of citizens in “the production of capital” for soil remediation; the design of gaming that specifically draws on measured and predicted effects of climate change; a performance piece that draws equally from local knowledge, public health and medical expertise; and several art and/or design works, focused on justice, that take place on local/regional levels but intervene in larger global processes. Learning and applying concepts and methodologies of social geography (the study of social relations within specific spaces and places) to these conditions will help us gain the insight and understanding needed to evaluate the roles that art, design and community practice have and will continue to play in contemporary societies.

(SPRING)


HPSS S461 THE PHILOSOPHY OF FOOD

3 credits

Yuriko Glaser

The issues related to food and eating have been receiving much attention lately in our society and beyond, in response to growing concerns over our health and the environment. However, until recently, Western philosophy did not include those food-related issues in its discourse. In this course we will address a number of philosophical issues related to food and eating. (1) Why were food-related issues neglected in Western philosophy? What are some of the consequences of such neglect? What is the role of food and eating in other philosophical traditions? (2) What are some of the moral, political, and environmental issues involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of food? For example, is there anything morally problematic about meateating? Do we have an ethical duty to feed the hungry in our society and other parts of the world? Is any form of the state’s paternalistic intervention in people’s eating habits an undue infringement on individual freedom? What are the environmental costs of today’s industrial farming, fishing, and global trade, what are some of the alternatives to reduce such costs, and are the alternatives successful? Are there any problems regarding genetically modified organisms as a food source? (3) Some regard certain forms of cooking as art, but can food be art? What are the aesthetic dimensions of food and eating? Can there be a standard of taste regarding food, or is it simply “a matter of taste”? (4) Finally, what is the role of cooking and eating in a good life? Does food simply provide nourishment for our physical survival, or can it enrich our lives in other ways? Through studying a variety of materials and films, we will explore these and other issues related to food.

(FALL)


HPSS S564 / IDISC 2403 NCSS CORE SEMINAR

3 credits

Peter Dean

This course provides an inter-disciplinary but comprehensive introduction to key issues in Nature-Culture- Sustainability studies. It will provide an in depth engagement with sustainable material use exploring the “five kingdoms” of nature, the “five core principles of sustainability” and “the five flows through the built environment”. The course will also address Biometics, Ecological Economics, Environmental Health and Wonder as well as providing in depth discussion of existing real world projects involving the use of sustainable materials. Attempts will be made to arm students with an effective understanding of how they can apply principles of sustainability to their future studies and careers. This course will lay the foundation for the NCSS Concentration students as they pursue their major degree as well as their participation in the NCSS Concentration. The course format will be lecture/seminar with occasional guest lectures.

Also offered as IDISC 2403. Register in the course for which credit is desired. Course Level: Sophomore, Junior Permission of Instructor Required

(FALL/SPRING)


HPSS S618 CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES IN ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits

Jeffrey Poland

In this course we will examine a number of controversies over various scientific, clinical, and social practices concerning mental illness. Topics include: classification and diagnosis (e.g, Is mental illness a myth?, Can mental health professionals distinguish normality from abnormality?, Is psychiatric classification useful?, Is there a gender bias in psychiatric classification?), the character of specific psychiatric conditions (e.g., alcoholism, depression, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), treatment issues (e.g., the psychotropic medication of young children, electroconvulsive therapy, suicide prevention), and social issues (e.g., the insanity defense, involuntary commitment, the duty to warn.)

HPSS S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates admitted to RISD in 2008 or after.

(SPRING)


ACADEMIC YEAR 2014-15


ID23ST/INTAR23ST GERM Studio

 

6 Credits

Peter Yeadon

Environmental contamination significantly increases hospital-­acquired infections, a major cause of patient mortality and morbidity. Infections are promoted by airborne diseases, and by patients and healthcare workers coming into direct contact with each other and contaminated surfaces. Hence, this advanced design studio will ask interior architecture students and industrial design students to work together to envision new antimicrobial hospital environments that can help us combat hospital1acquired infections.

During the semester, we will be looking at the protocols, materials, surfaces, and products and devices that are currently used in patient care rooms, where most hospital infections are acquired, and we will create a new paradigm that offers clear advantages. As designers, we will consider where pathogens linger, and we will explore opportunities to reshape spaces, systems, furnishings, products and devices, to reduce surface contact and transmission. It will be critical for us to entertain a variety of ways to manage and kill some of the more nasty microbes, as our work is intended to demonstrate how design innovation, propelled by emergent materials and technologies, is an important means to address the urgent, evolving problem of hospital-acquired infections. Working in groups that include both interior architecture students and industrial design students, each team will complete a comprehensive design for hospital patient care rooms.

(SPRING)


HPSS 443 SEM: DISEASE IN HISTORY

3 credits

Andrew Robarts

Through a survey of history’s great pandemics this course addresses, from an historical perspective, humanity’s response to the appearance and spread of epidemic diseases. While the biological aspects surrounding the contraction and spread of epidemic diseases will be discussed, this course will concern itself primarily with the transnational, environmental, and technological factors that have promoted and sustained regional or world-wide outbreaks of epidemic disease. Specific topics addressed in this course include: the connection between climatic or environmental conditions and the spread of disease; displacement, migration, and disease; and the development and evolution of medical institutions, quarantines, and public health systems.

Sophomore and above

HPSS S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates

(SPRING)


HPSS S444 WORKERS, CONSUMERS, AND HEALTH

3 credits

S. Bohme

The goal of this course is not to determine what is good for the health of workers or consumers, but rather to equip students to critically examine accepted notions of what is considered “healthy” by identifying and understanding the assumptions, values, and historical contexts that underlie those notions. We focus on consumers and workers to explore how ideas about health have been central to questions of identity, power and justice. We will begin a consideration of early twentieth century questions about workers safety and the emergence of a “therapeutic ethos” encouraging middle class to promote their own health through the consumer experiences. From there, we will ask how ideas about health figured in the development of consumer culture and the labor movement, emphasizing conflicts and solidarity between workers and consumers, the role of science and regulation in defining health, and the multiple and varied roots of anxieties about health. Finally, we’ll examine the post-1970 period, examining workers and consumer responses to chemical production and pollution, sweatshop labor, and the so-called “obesity epidemic.” Throughout, we will explore how notions of health intersect witth ideas about personal responsibility and self control, identity formation, and collective practices of citizenship and activism.

Sophomore and Above

HPSS S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates

(SPRING)


HPSS S445 AESTHETICS & ETHICAL MAKING

3 credits

Yuriko Saito

What constitutes the aesthetic values of objects? Do they consist of what affects our sensory experience? Is beauty only skin deep? Are aesthetic preference and judgment only a matter of personal taste; hence there is no disputing about taste? What happens to the aesthetic value of an object if we discover ethically problematic facts associated with it? What if the object’s creation, maintenance, and afterlife cause serious environmental harm, compromise the health of living organisms including humans, or involve various forms of social injustice? Do these facts affect the aesthetic value of the object? Should they? This course explores these questions that are becoming increasingly pressing today, as more problematic dimensions of artifacts continue to be exposed, while the aesthetic appeal of objects, in addition to their functional and economic values, compels our interactions with them. We hope to develop an informed, responsible and critical attitude toward the aesthetics of artifacts both as creators/designers and as citizens/consumers.

Sophomore and above

HPSS S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates

(SPRING)


 

HPSS S449 SEM: SOCIAL GEOGRAPHIES OF ART, DESIGN, AND COMMUNITY PRACTICE

3 credits

Marie Cieri

In this seminar, we will take a social geographical approach to investigating a growing trend toward the merging of art and design – and the aestheticization of everyday life – with the social, economic, political and environmental interests of global capitalism. Additionally, we will explore forces within contemporary art, design and community practice that are resisting these trends; examples include a collaborative project involving artists, scientists, landscape designers and many thousands of citizens in “the production of capital” for soil remediation; the design of gaming that specifically draws on measured and predicted effects of climate change; a performance piece that draws equally from local knowledge, public health and medical expertise; and several art and/or design works, focused on justice, that take place on local/regional levels but intervene in larger global processes. Learning and applying concepts and methodologies of social geography (the study of social relations within specific spaces and places) to these conditions will help us gain the insight and understanding needed to evaluate the roles that art, design and community practice have and will continue to play in contemporary societies.

HPSS S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates

(SPRING)


LAEL LE84 BIOLOGY OF ANIMAL-HUMAN INTERACTIONS

3 credits

Lucy Spelman

This course examines how human activity impacts the animal world, how animals impact us, and how both are affected by the health of the environment. We may find it convenient to think of humans as living in one sphere while plants and animals occupy another, but it’s not that simple. All creatures share the same basic needs for air, water, shelter, food, space, and companionship – and we compete for these resources. In order to maintain the balance necessary for healthy ecosystems, it’s essential that we understand how one species impacts another. Using a series of examples, we’ll explore these connections, beginning with simpler animals and ecosystems, and moving up to more complex ones. Topics covered include coral bleaching, the extinction of frogs, the use of DDT to control malaria, why dolphins strand, the future of polar bears – and more. We’ll also study the potential solutions to these problems.

(SPRING)


APPAR 3046 RESPONSIVE APPAREL DESIGN/ REDESIGNING THE HOSPITAL JOHNNY

3 credits

Donna Gustavsen

Based on the premise that innovative design, improved functionality, human dignity, and aesthetics play a role in recovery and well-being, this course will focus on the use of apparel design to create a positive impact on the patient experience. Small mixed groups of RISD students and Brown Medical students will share respective skills and perspectives in the redesign of the hospital Johnny Gown. Through on site research with patients and medical personnel, students will define hospital gown issues and create responsive design solutions. The course will provide students with grounding in the apparel design processes of draping, drafting and construction needed to create prototypes, and in fashion drawing to visualize and present concepts. Students will develop prototypes of their designs and conduct on site trials with patients and medical personnel.

 

(WINTER)


HPSS S469 INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE 

3 credits

Claudia Ford

This course will examine why indigenous knowledge systems have been portrayed as more effective ways of addressing pressing environmental challenges: sustainable development, climate change, biodiversity conservation, energy, sustainable agriculture, and the negative effects of globalization. We will demonstrate how art and design can make visible the often marginalized in knoweldge systems and pracites of indigenous communities.

(WINTER)


ARTH H618 DREAMS ON SCREEN: PSYCHOANALYSIS

3 credits

Maurizia Natali

Dreams, fantasies, hallucinations have been matter for religion, philosophy, and science, and have fascinated art, theater, and literature. Film makers have been challenged by these “altered states’ and by their social and aesthetic effect. Significantly, both cinema and psychoanalysis were born a century ago. Since the first definitions of film as new art, artists and critics have compared movies with dreams, and spectators with dreamers. This course analyzes how cinema represents dreams with specific visual imagery and techniques, how in these moments of intensified visual and aural experience cinema figures the psyche, echoes other arts and invents a new language to translate and critique ideas about these fascinating experiences. We will review films from American, European, and World Cinema and we will discuss basic texts about film, dreams, and dreamers with these questions in mind: How do spectators deal with the logic of dream sequences? Why do avant-gardes privilege dreams? How have Hollywood and “auteur’ cinema treated dreams? Do dreams have a “gender”. How the filmic imagery of dreams echo other arts and how is it “re-mediated’ in advertising, television, video? Weekly screenings, readings in film theory, discussions by groups, and essay exams.

(WINTER)


GRAD 155G ENCOUNTERING THINGS: SUBJECTS, OBJECTS, AND THE PROSTHETIC IMAGINATION

3 credits

Hannah Carlson

This class explores the ways that objects and bodies come into contact with one another, asking how objects adorn, articulate, equip, augment, and constitute the person. Our exploration follows three tracks: we examine artifacts from the fields of design, fashion and medical engineering, as well as experimental propositions from the visual and conceptual arts, literature and film; we pair these case studies with scholarship that critically engages issues of embodiment and material agency; and we attend to the political and ethical debates raised by dynamic conceptions of posthuman bodies. Interdisciplinary readings across the humanities and social sciences include: Appadurai, Freud, Haraway, Hayles, Heidegger, Latour, Marx, Miller, and Scary.

Graduate elective seminar

(FALL)


HPSS S160 FOOD AND GLOBALIZATION

3 credits

S. Bohme

This course uses food as an entry point to deepen our understanding of the history and complexities of globalization. Food production, distribution and marketing systems often cross borders and oceans. Consumers’ very bodies are implicated in transnational flows of not only food, but also of the chemical inputs used to grow crops in extensive, market-oriented production. Commercial agriculture and the food processing industry frequently depend on low-paid immigrant labor. In globalization, traditional diets morph, foods take on new cultural significance, and bodies change in response to altered eating habits. At the same time, struggle over food availability, production and consumption have become key sites of contestation in various parts of the world, as movements for food sovereignty, “slow food,” “localvorism,” fair trade, and organic production grow in visibility and number. Using a range of primary and secondary sources, including visits to local grocery stores, farmers’ markets, and farms, we will explore how the food we eat links us to the world beyond our borders.

(WINTER)


LAS E786 SEM: “EATING THE WAY BACK HOME”: FOOD, LITERATURE, AND IDENTITY

3 credits

Jonathan Highfield

In “The Wretched of the Earth” (1961), Frantz Fanon writes, “The relations of man with matter, with the world outside, and with history are in the colonial period simply relations with food.” Fanon recognizes that for the colonized subject existence itself is so threatened that every bit of food one can gain access to is, as he writes, “a victory felt as a triumph for life.” The foods people choose to eat and the ways they prepare those foods speak volumes about their relationship to the land and reflect their history. Postcolonial storytellers, writers, and filmmakers use food and foodways as markers of independence, as symbols of cultural colonization, and as signs of continued deprivations. Through foodways one can glimpse famines, invasions, and historical access to trade networks, and food itself can even serve as a vehicle for communication. Since these stories are not constructed in a vacuum, they also can reveal something about what food means in specific historical moments, in specific places, and for specific populations. This course will look at the roles food and foodways play in a series of narratives from formerly colonized spaces. Writers we will read may include Chris Abani, Bessie Head, Tsitsi Dangarembga, and Ken Saro-Wiwa.

Sophomore and above

(SPRING)


HPSS S450 SEM: MATRIX OF WISDOM: PHILOSOPHY & SCI-FI

3 credits

Donald Keefer

Philosophy, the quest for wisdom, seeks answers to life’s deepest and most enduring questions. How should we live? What is the truth? What is real? What and who are we in a universe of things unlike ourselves? At its core, philosophy is a discursive, argumentative probing that pokes at our fundamental assumptions about the world. The philosophical mind, of course, welcomes the challenge. In addition to philosophers raising these questions, fiction has been a vehicle for raising these issues and challenging the status quo mindset of its readers. Science fiction in particular, has long been occupied with questions regarding man’s place in the universe and the limits and potentials of science. While such philosophical probity rarely makes for great television viewing, there are a few shows, such as Star Trek, The X-Files and others, that are distinguished by their consistent philosophical texts in conjunction with the study and discussion of selected episodes from these extraordinary television series. Participation, several short papers and group presentations are required.

HPSS S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates

(SPRING)


LAEL LE88 MIND, BRAIN, & BEHAVIOR: AN INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

3 credits

Thomas McKeeff

This course will address questions of how psychological and cognitive functions are produced by the brain. The field of cognitive neuroscience aims to link the mind, the brain and behavior by trying to understand the biological nature of human thought and behavior. In this introductory course we will discuss several topics including: How is the brain built and how well can it rewire itself? How can we measure the living brain? What functions do various parts of the brain support? In particular we will discuss the neural underpinnings of perception, attention, memory, language, executive function, emotion, social cognition, and decision-making.

(WINTER)


ACADEMIC YEAR 2013-14


HPSS S461 THE PHILOSOPHY OF FOOD

3 credits

Yuriko Saito

The issues related to food and eating have been receiving much attention lately in our society and beyond, in response to growing concerns over our health and the environment. However, until recently, Western philosophy did not include those food-related issues in its discourse. In this course we will address a number of philosophical issues related to food and eating. (1) Why were food-related issues neglected in Western philosophy? What are some of the consequences of such neglect? What is the role of food and eating in other philosophical traditions? (2) What are some of the moral, political, and environmental issues involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of food? For example, is there anything morally problematic about meat-eating? Do we have an ethical duty to feed the hungry in our society and other parts of the world? Is any form of the state’s paternalistic intervention in people’s eating habits an undue infringement on individual freedom? What are the environmental costs of today’s industrial farming, fi shing, and global trade, what are some of the alternatives to reduce such costs, and are the alternatives successful? Are there any problems regarding genetically modifi ed organisms as a food source? (3) Some regard certain forms of cooking as art, but can food be art? What are the aesthetic dimensions of food and eating? Can there be a standard of taste regarding food, or is it simply “a matter of taste”? (4) Finally, what is the role of cooking and eating in a good life? Does food simply provide nourishment for our physical survival, or can it enrich our lives in other ways? Through studying a variety of materials and films, we will explore these and other issues related to food.

HPSS S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates

(FALL)


HPSS S449 SEM: SOCIAL GEOGRAPHIES OF ART, DESIGN, AND COMMUNITY PRACTICE

3 credits

Marie Cieri

In this seminar, we will take a social geographical approach to investigating a growing trend toward the merging of art and design – and the aestheticization of everyday life – with the social, economic, political and environmental interests of global capitalism. Additionally, we will explore forces within contemporary art, design and community practice that are resisting these trends; examples include a collaborative project involving artists, scientists, landscape designers and many thousands of citizens in “the production of capital” for soil remediation; the design of gaming that specifi cally draws on measured and predicted effects of climate change; a performance piece that draws equally from local knowledge, public health and medical expertise; and several art and/or design works, focused on justice, that take place on local/regional levels but intervene in larger global processes. Learning and applying concepts and methodologies of social geography (the study of social relations within specifi c spaces and places) to these conditions will help us gain the insight and understanding needed to evaluate the roles that art, design and community practice have and will continue to play in contemporary societies.

HPSS S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates

(SPRING)


IDISC 5506 ART AS A SOURCE OF HEALING: FALL

3 credits

Melinda Bridgman

This course will examine the connection between arts and healing from ancient times to the present and explore the contemporary movement of the arts in health care. Students will do a semester-long, collaborative arts practicum with patients and work closely with the Staff – either on-site at Bradley Hospital, a children’s psychiatric hospital, in East Providence, R.I., or at one of its residential treatment facilities. There will be a personal studio project; a practicum project; experiential workshops; visits by contemporary artist/healers; discussions with professionals about child mental health; assigned readings and writings; slide lectures; and journal-keeping.

NOTE: The fall semester is open to juniors, seniors, 5th year and graduate students with special permission of the instructor for sophomores.

Permission of instructor required

(FALL)


IDISC 5536 ART:SOURCE OF HEALING: SPRING

3 credits

Melinda Bridgman

This course will examine the connection between arts and healing from ancient times to the present and explore the contemporary movement of the arts in healthcare. Students will do a semester-long, collaborative arts practicum with patients and work closely with the Staff – either on-site at Bradley Hospital, a children’s psychiatric hospital, in East Providence, R.I., or at one of its residential treatment facilities. There will be a personal studio project; a practicum project; experiential workshops; visits by contemporary artist/healers; discussions with professionals about child mental health; assigned readings and writings; slide lectures; and journal-keeping.

Elective; junior and above

Permission of instructor required

(SPRING)


HPSS S666 NEUROETHICS

3 credits

Jeffrey Poland

In this course we will examine many of the ethical, social and philosophical issues raised by ongoing developments in the brain sciences. With improved understanding of how the brain works comes new powers for understanding, monitoring, and manipulating human cognitive, emotional and behavioral functioning; such new powers have potentially profound implications for the law, social policy, clinical practice, and personal experience. Topics to be covered will include: moral judgment and decision making, freedom of the will, moral and legal responsibility, use of psychopharmacology for enhancement of mood and cognition, the neural basis of pro-social and anti-social behavior, neuroimaging and privacy, the use of neuroimaging data in courts of law (e.g., to assess truth-telling and the accuracy of memory), brain injury and brain death, the development of neurotechnologies, and the importance of ethical and social guidelines.

HPSS S101 is a prerequisite for undergraduates

(FALL)


LAEL LE88 MIND, BRAIN & BEHAVIOR: AN INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

 3 credits

Thomas McKeeff

This course will address questions of how psychological and cognitive functions are produced by the brain. The field of cognitive neuroscience aims to link the mind, the brain and behavior by trying to understand the biological nature of human thought and behavior. In this introductory course we will discuss several topics including: How is the brain built and how well can it rewire itself? How can we measure the living brain? What functions do various parts of the brain support? In particular we will discuss the neural underpinnings of perception, attention, memory, language, executive function, emotion, social cognition, and decision-making.

(WINTER)


HPSS S450 THE MATRIX OF WISDOM: PHILOSOPHY & SCI-FI

3 credits

Don Keefer

Philosophy, the quest for wisdom, seeks answers to life’s deepest and most enduring questions. How should we live? What is the truth? What is real? What and who are we in a universe of things unlike ourselves? At its core, philosophy is a discursive, argumentative probing that pokes at our fundamental assumptions about the world. The philosophical mind, of course, welcomes the challenge. In addition to philosophers raising these questions, fiction has been a vehicle for raising these issues and challenging the status quo mindset of its readers. Science fiction in particular, has long been occupied with questions regarding man’s place in the universe and the limits and potentials of science. While such philosophical probity rarely makes for great television viewing, there are a few shows, such as Star Trek, The X-Files and others, that are distinguished by their consistent

(WINTER)


LAEL LE88 MIND, BRAIN & BEHAVIOR: AN INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

3 credits

Instructor TBA

This course will address questions of how psychological and cognitive functions are produced by the brain. The field of cognitive neuroscience aims to link the mind, the brain and behavior by trying to understand the biological nature of human thought and behavior. In this introductory course we will discuss several topics including: How is the brain built and how well can it rewire itself? How can we measure the living brain? What functions do various parts of the brain support? In particular we will discuss the neural underpinnings of perception, attention, memory, language, executive function, emotion, social cognition, and decision-making.

(WINTER)


ARTH H463 SCIENCE OF ART

3 credits

Matthew Landrus

This course will examine scientific and technical applications developed by Western artists and visual theorists from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century. Concentrating on pictorial traditions, the course will address what artists, authors and artist/engineers have referred to as scientific, technical, mechanical, and purely mental solutions to optical, proportional and quantitative visual problems. General themes will be perspective, form, color, and mechanical devices, and will include discussions on intellectual training, notebooks, treatises, and collecting. The course will examine artists such as Masaccio, Leonardo, Piero della Francesca, D|rer, Serlio, Carlo Urbino, Cigoli, Rubens, Vel`zquez, Saenredam, Vermeer, Poussin, Andrea Pozzo, Canaletto, Phillip Otto Runge,Turner, Delacroix, Monet, and Seurat.

(WINTER)